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Projects

Learn about Projects for Oklahoma Water Resources Board Investor Relations, including OWRB Projects for SFY2019, Projects Identified for Receiving CWSRF Assistance within SFY 2018, and Altus Municipal Authority.

OWRB Projects for SFY2019

Projects Identified for Receiving CWSRF Assistance within SFY 2018

Altus Municipal Authority

The Altus Municipal Authority (Authority) is located in Jackson County in the southwest corner of Oklahoma with a population of 19,784 (2010 US Census) and currently services 6,632 sewer customers. Altus’ Southeast Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) is an extended aeration plant designed to treat an average daily flow of 3.5 million gallons per day (MGD). The facility has a new Discharge Permit to an unnamed tributary to Stinking Creek. This permit requires seasonal effluent disinfection that will be addressed by the proposed project. The treatment facility has been in violation of the chloride limits which ODEQ has agreed to revise the permit to remove the chloride and TDS limits. The Authority used the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) proceeds to repair and upgrade the WWTF, and install new Automated Meter Infrastructure (AMI) that reduces wastewater generation and air-pollutants deposition. Specifically, the Authority plans to install a new mechanical bar screen, replace existing pumps, modify the existing aeration basin influent distribution box, replace equipment in the existing clarifier and construct a new clarifier, a new auxiliary return activated sludge pump station, new ultraviolet effluent disinfection system, replace bypass pond pumps, replace existing plant control system, miscellaneous structures, piping, and electrical work, and other minor plant work. The AMI project will replace approximately 8,000 existing water meters and 12,000 existing electric meters. The project meets the criteria from the Oklahoma Conservation Commission, under its Nonpoint Source Management Plan, for the replacement of outdated electric metering infrastructure with automated infrastructure (AMIs). The use of AMIs should help the city residents realize reductions in energy usage, and reduces the need for energy exploration and development. In addition, more efficient energy usage relates to decreased carbon emissions, a leading cause of climate change

Broken Arrow Municipal Authority

The Broken Arrow Municipal Authority (Authority) is located in Tulsa County is a thriving community located in Tulsa County and currently serves 34,650 sewer customers and 36,596 water customers. The city’s population is 98,850 according to the 2010 US Census. The City has been working since April of 2008 to transition their customers to drive-by AMRs for the water utility system. The new meters will provide leak detection alerts, thereby reducing unintended flows to the wastewater system. Additionally, the installation of the meters could lead to increased water supply reliability through providing the system officials with a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities, and will help the Authority meet Oklahoma's Water for 2060 goals The Authority will utilize the Oklahoma Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) proceeds to acquire and install approximately 9,000 automated meter reading (AMR) water meters, as well as meter boxes, meter box lids, shut-off valves, and hand held meter reading devices. This project focuses on water conservation and efficiency by reducing water loss in Broken Arrow's system

Bixby Public Works Authority

The Bixby Public Works Authority (Authority) is located in Tulsa County and currently serves 8,379 sewer customers. The city’s population is 21,034 according to the 2010 US Census, and is considered the 4th fastest growing city in Oklahoma as of the 2015 American Community Survey. The City of Bixby’s corporate limits are divided into two separate wastewater collection basins by a northwest-southeast stretch of the Arkansas River. The City collects and treats wastewater in two separate lagoon treatment facilities on opposite sides of the Arkansas River, named the North and South Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTP), respectively. The North WWTP is permitted to discharge 0.853 million gallons per day (MGD) and the South WWTP is permitted to discharge 0.684 MGD. Both plants discharge into the Arkansas River which is listed on Oklahoma’s 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies for Enterococcus, Turbidity, and Cadmium. In 2013 the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) issued Bixby a consent order for discharge permit violations for both WWTPs that resulted from excessive flow rates due to population growth. The Authority will use the Oklahoma Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) proceeds to install a new automated meter reading (AMR) system and construct a new sequence batch reactor (SBR) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to transfer the flow of the North Collection System thereby eliminating all discharge from the North WWTP. The AMR system will replace approximately 9,000 older meters which contribute to unaccounted water loss. AMRs provide leak detection alerts, thereby reducing unintended flows to the wastewater system. Additionally, installation of AMRs could lead to increased water supply reliability because the Authority has a better understanding of any potential system vulnerabilities. The new SBR WWTP will have a single discharge point BINDING COMMITMENT Approval: $24,000,000 Approval Date: 9/19/2017 ASSISTANCE PROVIDED Loan Amount: $24,000,000 Funded Date: 9/28/2017 Percent Complete as of 6/30/2018: 6.17% Additional Subsidization: N/A GPR: Water Efficiency: $2,580,569.50 Energy Efficiency: $260,225.00 Estimated Savings: $2,522,000 OKLAHOMA CWSRF 201 8 ANNUAL REPORT 9 and will provide on-site stormwater equalization to prevent bypasses at the South WWTP. This will decrease the amount of sediment to the Arkansas River.