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Projects

Learn about Projects for Oklahoma Water Resources Board, including OWRB Projects for SFY2019, SFY2020 CWSRF Annual Report, and Cameron Public Works Authority.

OWRB Projects for SFY2019

SFY2020 CWSRF Annual Report

This Annual Report to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) details Oklahoma's Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) and its financial performance and programmatic highlights. This report reviews the allotment of the CWSRF Report to Congress, environmental benefits of Oklahoma's CWSRF Green Infrastructure Projects and best practices in Green Infrastructure and Sustainability along with an outline of any additional subsidization made available for the applicable fiscal year. 

For the full report, click Oklahoma's SFY2020 CWSRF Annual Report.

Cameron Public Works Authority

The Cameron Public Works Authority (Authority) located in LeFlore County serves 149 sewer customers and 168 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S Census the population was 302. The community is a small community and met the criteria to receive 100% loan forgiveness from the CWSRF Additional Subsidization for planning and design. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon system with selective discharge. The design average daily flow is 0.055 MGD, and the receiving stream is an unnamed tributary to the Poteau River which is listed on the 303(d) list for silver, turbidity, cadmium, copper, selenium, and lead. 

The proposed project is for planning and design for rehabilitation of the existing sewer system including the collection system, lift station, sewer lagoon, and chlorine/dechlorinating basin in order to address the violations listed in the Consent Order. These enhancements will increase the treatment capacity and improve the effluent being discharged into the Poteau River.

Carney Public Utilities Authority

Carney Public Utilities Authority (Authority) located in Lincoln County serves 172 sewer customers and 273 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 647.  This community is small and fits the criteria of our principal forgiveness program. The project is Phase II of principal forgiveness funds for the construction portion of a project that received 100% principal forgiveness for Phase I planning and design.

The water supply system has water meters that no longer provide accurate readings resulting in apparent water loss to the Authority. The wastewater collection system has problems with inflow and infiltration (I/I), which often cause the system to exceed its capacity and result in sanitary sewer overflows.

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon with sand filter system which has a Design Average Daily Flow of 0.105 MGD.  The receiving stream is an unnamed tributary to Bell Cow Creek which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus.

The Authority will utilize the proceeds of the CWSRF loan to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters; replace 4,000 linear feet of eight (8) inch sanitary sewer line, and fifteen (15) manholes. A portion of this project focuses on water conservation and efficiency by identifying water loss in Carney’s system. These improvements could lead to increased water supply reliability by providing the system officials with a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities. Additional improvements to the collection system will reduce I/I which will reduce unintended flows to the wastewater treatment plant.  Finally, the project will help meet Oklahoma’s Water for 2060 goals.

Coweta Public Works Authority

The Coweta Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Wagoner County serves 3,542 sewer customers and 3,243 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 9,943. 

The Authority’s wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) utilizes flow-through lagoons equipped with mechanical aeration followed by a polishing pond and disinfection basin.  The growth of the City is at a pace exceeding the state average for the next 20 years, and the current WWTP is not configured or equipped to provide adequate treatment for the flow associated with population growth.  

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon system with a design average daily flow of 3.0 MGD.  The receiving stream for the system is the Arkansas River which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to construct a new lift station, concrete a lagoon, construct lagoon partition walls to create two (2) aeration basins, construct two (2) aerobic sludge digesters and construct one (1) flow equalization basin, an activated sludge pump station, two (2) secondary clarifiers, and sludge drying beds along with modification of their existing disinfection basin. These enhancements will result in processing improvements to allow wastewater treatment to be more efficient and effective for community residents and businesses in and near the Authority  and will help to preserve the existing aquatic habitat through improved quality of system effluent.

Dewar Public Works Authority

The Dewar Public Works Authority (Authority) is located in Okmulgee County and serves 343 sewer customers and 359 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 888. The Town of Dewar is a relatively small community and met the criteria to receive 100% loan forgiveness from the CWSRF Additional Subsidization for planning and design. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon system with a design average daily flow of 0.14 MGD, with Coal Creek as the receiving stream which is on the 303(d) list for fishes bio assessments. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds for engineering, planning and design to upgrade their existing flow-through lagoon system to bring the system up to current standards. Once the project is complete the updates will help to improve water quality in Coal Creek, which is listed as stated above as recreational and/or ecological significant waters, by reducing unpermitted discharges into the creek.

Duncan Public Utilities Authority

The Duncan Public Utilities Authority (Authority) located in Stephens County and serves 9,064 sewer customers and 9,418 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 23,431. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that is designed for a peak flow of 6.25 MGD of wastewater.  During intense rainfall events influent flows at the WWTP have exceeded 13.0 MGD.  A study was conducted to identify I&I, reduce the frequency of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs), and reduce peak wet weather flows to the wastewater treatment plant.

The system is designed for an average daily flow of 3 MGD. The receiving stream is an unnamed tributary to East Cow Creek which is on the 303(d) list for escherichia coli, enterococcus, and turbidity.   

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to begin a city-wide inflow and infiltration (I&I) multi-phased project to include: the rehabilitation of 402 manholes, replacement of 107 manholes, rehabilitation of 24,731 linear feet (lf) and the replacement of 10,539 lf of sewer lines. Phase two will consist of a sewer system evaluation survey with an expected rehab and replacement of an additional 153 manholes and rehab and replacement of 28,000 lf of sewer lines. These improvements will help to reduce unintended flows to the wastewater treatment plant.

Durant City Utilities Authority

The Durant City Utilities Authority (Authority) located in Bryan County serves 6,300 sewer customers and 6,405 water customers. The population according to the 2010 U.S. Census was 15,856. 

The Authority has a Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF) that needs to be upgraded prior to capacity being exceeded. Some of the equipment in the plant has exceeded its life capacity and is in need of rehabilitation.   

The Authority’s current treatment process is an extended aeration lagoon with a design average daily flow of 4.0 MGD. The receiving stream is Caney Creek, to Island Bayou, to the Red River which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus, escherichia coli, and macroinvertebrate bio. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to rehabilitate the wastewater treatment facility. Project elements will include: constructing a post equalization basin, rehabilitating the UV disinfection system, constructing an additional sequential batch reactor basin, rehabilitate the existing sequential batch reactor basins, and update the blower system. Additionally, the Authority will replace their SCADA system and update the treatment plant’s electrical and piping. These improvements will allow the Authority to maintain compliance with their water quality treatment permit limits and prepare the plant to expand its treatment capacity in phase II.

East Central Oklahoma Water Authority

The East Central Oklahoma Water Authority (Authority) located in Muskogee County serves 250 sewer customers and 629 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 616. The community is a small community and met the criteria to receive 100% loan forgiveness from the CWSRF Additional Subsidization for planning and design. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon sewer system for the Town of Webbers Falls with an average daily flow of 0.045 MGD, and discharges to an unnamed tributary to Dirty Creek. The Authority is in need of sewer collection repairs and automatic meter readers (AMR’s). 

Dirty Creek is on the 303(d) list for macroinvertebrate bio, enterococcus, dissolved oxygen, sulfates, fishes bio assessments, and pH. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds for planning and design for sewer collection repairs and to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters. A portion of this project focuses on water conservation and efficiency by identifying water loss in the Authority’s system. Once completed, these enhancements will address inflow and infiltration issues helping to maintain water quality into Dirty Creek and nearby ground water sources.

Elgin Public Works Authority

The Elgin Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Comanche County serves 942 sewer customers and 1,180 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 2,156. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is a wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) that utilizes lagoons to treat its wastewater, combined with slow rate application of effluent on irrigation fields located adjacent to the WWTF.  The system has a design average daily flow of 0.185 MGD. 

A Sanitary Sewer Evaluation Study (SSES) performed during Phase I of the Authority’s improvements to the WWTF indicated that during some rainfall events I&I can dominate flows. The proposed project for Phase II improvements provides for expanded storage lagoon and irrigation capacity to meet the anticipated growth within the city, and addresses operational concerns of debris in the existing aerated treatment lagoons. 

The project includes the installation of a grinder at the inlet of the influent lift station, a new storage basin to the north of the treatment lagoons, and correction of inflow and infiltration in portions of the wastewater collection system, and other appurtenances required to complete the project.  These enhancements will help to prevent unpermitted discharges from wet weather.

Enid Municipal Authority

The Enid Municipal Authority (Authority) is located in Garfield County serves 18,362 sewer customers and 19,561 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 49,379. . 

The Authority’s current treatment system is an activated sludge system with a design average daily flow of 12.0 MGD. Koch Fertilizer purchased 4 MGD of Enid’s flow leaving a permitted discharge of 8.0 MGD. The receiving stream is Skeleton Creek which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus, turbidity, selenium, and oil and grease. 

In May 2010, the Authority used CWSRF proceeds for the construction of a detention pond, headworks, primary and secondary clarifiers, a sludge pump station, a cascade aeration and UV disinfection unit, splitter boxes and an administrative building. The Authority will use the current funds to refinance a portion of the 2010 loan while maintaining the original loan term. The improvements in 2010 provide an improvement in water quality to community residents and businesses in and near the Authority.

Haileyville Public Works Authority

Haileyville Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Pittsburg County serves 296 sewer customers and 344 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 813.  The community is relatively small and meets our qualifications to receive Phase II Construction principal forgiveness funds.

The water supply system has water meters that no longer provide accurate readings resulting in apparent water loss to the Authority. The collection system also has aged clay tile pipe that has broken due to ground movement and tree root intrusion. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is an activated sludge treatment system with a design average daily flow of 0.13 MGD.  The receiving stream is an unnamed tributary to Blue Creek, which flows to Brushy Creek which are both on the 303(d) list for oil and grease, turbidity, lead, enterococcus, dissolved oxygen, pH, and escherichia coli.

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters; replace 2,250 linear feet of eight (8) inch sanitary sewer line, and six (6) manholes. Part of the project focuses on water conservation and efficiency by identifying water loss in Haileyville’s system. These improvements could lead to increased water supply reliability by providing the system officials with a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities. Additional improvements to the collection system will reduce I/I thereby reducing unintended flows to the wastewater treatment plant.  Finally, the project will help meet Oklahoma’s Water for 2060 goals.

Hartshorne Public Works Authority

The Hartshorne Public Works Authority (Authority) is located in Pittsburg County and serves 751 sewer customers and 911 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population of the town was 2,125. 

 The Authority has 949 active water meters, most of which are 20 to 25 years old and have been extended past their design life. The system has a total water loss of 50% of which approximately 15% can be attributed to meter inaccuracy.   

The Authority’s current treatment process is an oxidation ditch with a design average daily flow of 0.50 MGD.  The receiving stream is an unnamed tributary to Blue Creek which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus and escherichia coli. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). This project focuses on water conservation and efficiency by reducing water loss in Hartshorne’s system. The new meters will provide leak detection alerts, thereby reducing unintended flows to the wastewater system. With this installation, it could lead to increased water supply reliability by providing the system officials with a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities. Finally, the project will help to meet Oklahoma’s Water for 2060 goals.

Inola Public Works Authority

The Inola Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Rogers County serves 660 sewer and water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 1,788. This relatively small community met the qualifications to receive principal forgiveness on Phase II, the construction of the project for which they received Phases I principal forgiveness for planning and design. 

An Inflow and Infiltration (I&I) study was conducted for the Authority and outlined necessary improvements to reduce the impact of the I&I and eliminate the unpermitted sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) within the system. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is an aerated lagoon. The design average daily flow is .40 MGD. The receiving stream is the Pea Creek which is on the 303(d) list for escherichia and enterococcus. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds for the installation of 18-inch, 15-inch, and 8-inch sewer line, 24 manholes, and repairing 6 existing manholes. Additional project elements include: a railroad bore, lift station, and an emergency generator for the wastewater treatment plant. These improvements will allow the Authority to achieve compliance with their water quality requirements by reducing the unpermitted SSOs.  Furthermore, preventing unintended flows in to the wastewater treatment plant will improve treatment efficiency improving the water quality in Pea Creek for community residents and businesses.

Kingfisher Public Works Authority

The Kingfisher Public Works Authority (Authority) is located in Kingfisher County and serves 2,592 sewer customers and 2,700 water customers. The population, according to the 2010 U.S. Census was $4,633. 

The Authority owns and operates the wastewater treatment facility that consists of a collection system, activated sludge, and a sequencing batch reactor wastewater treatment plant (WWTP).

The Authority’s current treatment process is a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR), with a 0.8 MGD design average daily flow which discharges into Kingfisher Creek, which is listed on the 303(d) list as an impaired body because of enterococcus and dissolved oxygen.

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to rehabilitate and upgrade its existing wastewater treatment plant. These improvements will include headworks, sequencing batch reactor equipment, ultra violet disinfection, along with pump and laboratory building work. These improvements will allow the Authority to maintain compliance with their discharge permit requirements for discharge into Kingfisher Creek improving the water quality for community residents and businesses.

Meeker Public Works Authority

The Meeker Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Lincoln County serves 362 sewer customers and 433 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, they had a population of approximately 1,144. The community is relatively small and meets our qualifications to receive 100% principal forgiveness for planning and design. 

The Authority owns and operates a sewer system where a majority of the existing sanitary lines and manholes are in poor condition resulting in inflow and infiltration (I/I). I/I decreases the efficiency and increases the cost of treatment.

The Authority’s current treatment process of the system is extended aeration, with a design average daily flow of 0.2 MGD. The receiving stream for the system is Quapaw Creek, South which is listed on the 303(d) list for enterococcus, macroinvertebrate bio, and fishes bio assessments. 

The Authority will use the proceeds for design of sanitary sewer collection system enhancements. These improvements include the design of approximately 16,001 linear feet (lf) of sanitary sewer replacement and repair of fifty (50) manholes. Once completed, these enhancements will address I/I issues thereby reducing unintended flows to the wastewater treatment plant helping to maintain water quality in the South Quapaw Creek and nearby ground water sources.

Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust (OCWUT) located in Oklahoma County serves 213,985 sewer customers and 223,777 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 579,999. 

The Trust will utilize the proceeds for two road improvement projects. Both projects will restore the road surface to prevent sedimentation and minimize turbidity in two of the Trust’s reservoirs. The first provides for resurfacing of approximately two (2) miles of shoreline road along East Stanley Draper Road, from Water Plant Road to South Westminster Road. The second includes the resurfacing of approximately one and a half (1.5) miles of shoreline road along North Overholser Drive from N. County Line Road to NW 36th Street. These projects are a necessary first step by the City to help limit pollution to both Lake Overholser and Lake Stanley Draper. Both lakes’ watersheds are among the top 100 watersheds prioritized in Oklahoma’s Nonpoint Source Management Plan (NPSMP). This project is consistent with NPSMP efforts and will help to meet the State of Oklahoma’s Water for 2060 goals.

Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust

The Oklahoma City Water Utilities Trust (Trust) received approval for $129,000,000 in funding  from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (OWRB) to improve the Trust’s water and wastewater systems. The first request was for $74,000,000 financed by the Oklahoma Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) with a second request totaling $55,000,000 to be funded through the State Revenue Bond Loan Program (FAP).

The Trust utilized the DWSRF proceeds to replace a balancing tank along the Atoka pipeline and for the installation of emergency generators along multiple booster stations throughout the city. This will help to maintain water delivery to customers during power outages. The FAP proceeds were used to refinance two series of bonds and outstanding commercial paper notes which were for several water and sewer projects throughout Oklahoma City’s system. 

A key benefit for the Water Utilities Trust was to lock into low interest rates and draw the money as needed which provided planning flexibility.

Pawhuska Public Works Authority

The Pawhuska Public Works Authority (Authority) is located in Osage County and serves 3,800 water customers and 3,000 sewer customers. The population, according to the 2010 U.S. Census was 3,516. 

The Pawhuska dam has an area which has experienced shallow cracking and subsequent shallow sloughing. This has resulted in damage to the existing guardrail of the dam as a result of shifting soil around the support posts. 

The Authority will use the funding to stabilize the ground around the dam to stop further damage from occurring and replace intake structure valves to regulate the flow from the dam. These improvements have been approved as a Nonpoint Source (NPS) project through the CWSRF program as it will help to prevent further erosion and potential dam failure while protecting the health of the downstream waterbodies.

Roland Utility Authority

The Roland Utility Authority (Authority) serves approximately 1190 sewer customers and 1316 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 3,169.

Approximately 50% of the water meters have reached the end of their useful life. These meters do not accurately record water usage, resulting in apparent water loss to the Authority.

The Authority’s current treatment system is a lagoon system with a design average daily flow of .074 MGD. The receiving stream is a tributary to Garrison Creek which is on the 303(d) list for pH. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters. This project will focus on water conservation and efficiency by identifying water loss in Roland’s system. Increased water supply reliability could be achieved by providing the system officials with a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities and will reduce unintended flows to the wastewater treatment facility. Finally, the project will help meet Oklahoma’s Water for 2060 goals.

Shawnee Municipal Authority

The Shawnee Municipal  Authority (Authority) located in Pottawatomi County serves approximately 10,761 sewer customers and 12,025 water customers.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 29,857. 

The treatment used at the South Wastewater Treatment Plant (SWWTP) has key mechanical equipment and systems at the plant have exceeded their design service life, resulting in excessive Operations and Maintenance (O&M) requirements. Additionally various treatment process structures have cracks, leaks, or other structural issues and occasionally do not meet all of the discharge values for which it is permitted.  The physical condition of the North Wastewater Treatment Plant (NWWTP) is relatively good but there are several items that need to be addressed to improve the plant performance.

The Authority’s current treatment process is a trickling filter system with a design average daily flow of 3 MGD in their South treatment system. They also operate an extended aeration system with a design average daily flow of 3 MGD. The receiving stream for both of these facilities is the North Canadian River which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus, turbidity, pH, and fishes bio assessments. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to construct a southside lift station and construct a new SBR treatment plant at the northside treatment plant to better manage the influent flow of both treatment facilities allowing them to work in conjunction with one another. These projects will improve the water quality of the Authority’s wastewater discharge into the North Canadian River; positively impacting the surrounding residents and businesses.

Shidler Public Works Authority

The Shidler Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Osage County serves 195 sewer customers and 202 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 441. This relatively small community meets our qualifications to receive loan forgiveness.   

The Authority has water meters that are at the end, or near the end, of their useful life. They have a sewer system therefore they are eligible to fund this project through the CWSRF program.  

The Authority’s current treatment process is a lagoon with a design average daily flow of 0.12 MGD. The receiving stream is Salt Creek which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). This project helps to meet Oklahoma's Water for 2060 goals by focusing on water conservation and efficiency and reducing unintended flows to the wastewater treatment plant.

Tahlequah

The Tahlequah Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Cherokee County serves approximately 6,108 sewer customers and 7,653 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census they had a population of 15,753.

The Authority’s wastewater treatment plant is in need of improvements to avoid bypasses following extended rainfall events. Two (2) aerobic digesters are in need of structural repairs, new aeration piping, new diffusers and new blowers. The existing headworks (screening and grit removal) are in poor condition and have served their useful life.

The Authority’s current treatment process is activated sludge. The design average daily flow is 5.27 MGD. They discharge into Tahlequah Creek, which is listed on the 303(d) list for escherichia coli.

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to repair existing aerobic digesters, expand the wet weather pump station, construct a new headworks, and to construct a third flow equalization basin at the wastewater treatment plant. These improvements will help to regulate the inflow during wet weather events and ensure proper treatment of the wastewater before it is discharged into Tahlequah Creek, a tributary of the Illinois River.

Wagoner County Rural Water, Sewer, Gas & Solid Waste Management District #4

Wagoner County Rural Water, Sewer, Gas & Solid Waste Management District #4 (the District) located in Wagoner County had 2,065 sewer customers and 10,897 water customers as of June 2018.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 23,472. 

The wastewater collection system is experiencing some corrosion in their manholes and lift stations. The buildup of corrosion causes some concern for the District. 

The District has identified the following issues: rain washing surrounding gravel onto the access door, odor complaints, dialer problems, backups during large rain events, and wipes clogging the pumps.  The two largest lift stations in the system receive wastewater from multiple lift stations and their capacity could be exceeded if all feeder lift stations pump simultaneously. 

The District’s current treatment process is an aerated lagoon system with a design average daily flow of 0.85 MGD. The receiving stream is an unnamed tributary to Coal Creek. 

The District will utilize the proceeds to construct a new wastewater treatment plant, replace manholes, and install two  new lift stations, equalization basins, and generators, along with odor and corrosion control. These enhancements will improve effluent discharge to Coal Creek while ensuring adequate service to community residents and businesses in and near the District.

Waurika Public Works Authority

The Waurika Public Works Authority (Authority) located in Jefferson County serves 751 sewer customers and 849 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 2,064. 

The Authority provides potable water to 2,000 customers in the Town of Waurika, Ryan Utility Authority and Jefferson Co. RWD No. 1. All of the meters in the system are in excess of 20 years old and about 6% of the water supplied is lost through inaccurate meter readings. This has resulted in higher operation costs and loss of revenue for the Authority.  

The Authority’s current treatment process is an extended aeration system with a design average daily flow of 0.3 MGD. The receiving stream is Beaver Creek to the Red River which is on the 303(d) list for enterococcus, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and total dissolved solids. 

The Authority will utilize the proceeds to acquire and install Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) water meters and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI). This project focuses on water conservation and efficiency by reducing water loss in Waurika’s system. The new meters will provide leak detection alerts, thereby reducing unintended flows to the wastewater system. With this installation, it could lead to increased water supply reliability through providing the system officials with a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities. Finally, the project will help to meet Oklahoma’s Water for 2060 goals.

Westville Utility Authority

The Westville Utility Authority (Authority) located in Adair County serves 568 sewer customers and 745 water customers. According to the 2010 U.S. Census the population was 1,639. The Authority is a small community and met the criteria to receive 100% loan forgiveness from the CWSRF Additional Subsidization for planning and design.

The system needs additional centralized sanitary sewer collection in areas where septic tank systems are failing. 

The Authority’s current treatment process is an aerated lagoon system with a design average daily flow of 0.28 MGD. The receiving stream is Shell Branch.

The Authority will utilize the 100% principal forgiveness proceeds for engineering studies, planning and evaluation of a centralized sanitary sewer system expansion. This project will provide service to an additional fifteen (15) new customers and allow for effluent to be transported to the wastewater treatment while reducing discharges into Shell Branch Creek.